postheadericon It’s time to patch your Microsoft and Adobe software again against vulnerabilities

It’s the second Tuesday of the month, and you know what that means… Yep, it’s time for another bundle of essential security updates from Microsoft.

The post It’s time to patch your Microsoft and Adobe software again against vulnerabilities appeared first on WeLiveSecurity


WeLiveSecurity

postheadericon What To Do If You Get Called Out By Another Gun Owner

What you don’t know can hurt you. It’s a simple truth that we gun owners can become hardened to. The toughest pill to swallow is when someone calls you out for something and they’re right.

In the interest of saying I’m not immune, I’ll relay a little story.

One time I was taking an AR-15 rifle course with a bunch of other guys with a mix of different backgrounds. During this particular portion of the course, we were firing from the 15 yard line and then walking down to our targets to figure out our zero.

Two things happened to me during this course:

#1: I never used a scope on an AR-15 platform.

By this point, I had only ever used iron sights or, on a few occasions, red dot optics.

The scope I mounted wasn’t mounted correctly. But I couldn’t know what I didn’t know. And being stubborn, I didn’t ask for help. Unsurprisingly, my shot groups were all over the place as my scope bounced around between shots.

One of the other students in the class noticed I hadn’t affixed the scope correctly and called me out about it. He was polite but he noticed I hadn’t done something correctly and it was affecting my performance. So he volunteered to help and show me how to identify the problem and correct it.

#2: I’m a lefty.

The range safety officer instructed us to lock the bolt to the rear and sling our rifles behind us when we walked down to our targets.

The way my rifle hung behind me, the slide lock kept pressing against my back, causing the bolt to go home.

This understandably made the other participants nervous. No one likes to be walking up to the target while on the line with complete strangers and hear a bolt carrier group slam home.

And, after it happened, I’d obviously want to rack and lock the slide to the rear.

This didn’t help the situation at all. The range safety officer called me out on the bolt slamming home and told me if I couldn’t keep it locked, I’d need to leave it back at the firing line with the bolt locked to the rear, ejection port facing up.

And that’s what I ended up having to do.

I didn’t like being called out but the range safety officer was right. And I needed to respect my other fellow students as well as the range safety personnel.

Is it embarrassing getting called out on the range or in the real-world? Yeah. It sucks.

However, when the person calling you out has a point, it’s time to put the ego aside and do what needs to be done. A simple acknowledgement of, “I see what you mean” or “thank you for letting me know. I’ll get that fixed” can help allay any hard feelings and show that you intend to follow through.

Of course, it helps when the person calling you out is polite and direct.

That’s a bonus — not a requirement.

And depending upon the severity of the mess-up — like a bad habit that could jeopardize the safety of others and yourself — you may not always have the luxury of polite instruction.

Take advice with a grain of salt but definitely consider the merit of it. Not all advice is helpful. Not all advice is practical. And not all advice is correct.

If someone is very adamant you need to be doing something different but you honestly don’t see what that other person is talking about, ask him or her to explain. If after he or she explains it still doesn’t make sense, tell him you’ll look into it and move along.

A sign of a responsible person is the one willing to accept advice when something he’s doing is unsafe. Responsible concealed carry can sometimes fall into this category. If someone out in the real world or at the range spots some behavior of yours that could get you or someone else into trouble, take the lesson at face value, be thankful someone stopped to point it out, and correct the behavior if possible.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon UK banks urged to do more to tackle rampant online fraud

Banks are being urged to step up to the plate and to “work together to tackle this problem head on”, as their response has been found to be disproportionate to the scale of the problem.

The post UK banks urged to do more to tackle rampant online fraud appeared first on WeLiveSecurity


WeLiveSecurity

postheadericon Business Email Compromise scammer sentenced to 41 months in prison

A US judge has sentenced a Nigerian man to three years and five months in a federal prison after he pleaded guilty to taking part in a business email compromise scam that targeted organisations around the world.

The post Business Email Compromise scammer sentenced to 41 months in prison appeared first on WeLiveSecurity


WeLiveSecurity

postheadericon WATCH: Store Owner Shoots At Armed Robbers, Sends One To The Ground

WHITEHAVEN, TN — When a pair of thugs entered a phone store looking to make some cash, they were soundly beaten by the store’s owner.

They were already brandishing their guns, and that was all the warning the owner needed to counter the attack.

As FOX 13 reports:

A Whitehaven store owner fought back when two armed robbers came into his store. It happened just Friday evening just before 6:00 p.m. on Millbranch near Shelby Drive.

The store owner fired his gun and started shooting at the two men. He hit one of the suspects who immediately dropped to the ground. The man was taken to the hospital and is expected to be okay. The other suspect is at large.

By the time the would-be robbers made it a few feet inside the door, they were being fired on.

As the surveillance video below shows, the fight was decidedly one-sided.

One of the suspects was reportedly hit, and found at the hospital later.

Take a look at the surveillance video below:

These thugs didn’t know what hit them.

This is another example of the importance of carrying firearms at work. These robbers were clearly ready to shoot the workers at the store.

Everyone in the area was threatened because someone thought it was a good idea to attack a local businessman, and if no one was armed except for the robbers, there’s a better than average chance an innocent person would end up seriously injured, or worse.

Stay safe out there, folks.

What do you think about this story? Please share this on Facebook and Twitter and let us know!

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Net Neutrality Neutered by FCC

After months of controversy, the FCC has ended Net Neutrality. Protect your network from these changes with a FlashRouter.

The post Net Neutrality Neutered by FCC appeared first on FlashRouters Networking & VPN Blog.

FlashRouters Networking & VPN Blog

postheadericon Cybersecurity Trends 2018: The costs of connection

To help the reader navigate through the maze of such threats, ESET’s thought leaders have zeroed in on several areas that top the priority list in our exercise in looking forward.

The post Cybersecurity Trends 2018: The costs of connection appeared first on WeLiveSecurity


WeLiveSecurity

postheadericon Memes: the explanation of nearly everything – including computer viruses

We still don’t have a solid scientific theory of memes; nonetheless, they already allow us to understand why certain things happen the way they do. Memes are “alive”; they reproduce, mutate, and evolve according to Darwinian laws.

The post Memes: the explanation of nearly everything – including computer viruses appeared first on WeLiveSecurity


WeLiveSecurity

postheadericon [FIREARM REVIEW] Sig Sauer P250 – ‘Gone With The Wind’ Edition

In another review, I discussed a recent purchase and test of the Sig Sauer SP2022. The SP2022 marked Sig Sauer’s first move towards a polymer-style pistol. The P250 marked its first true step towards complete pistol modularity.

If you’re like any concealed carrier I’ve ever met that gets a funny look on his face after getting hit with a pop-marketing word like modularity, you’d naturally ask:

What the heck does modularity and why is the P250 so important?

If you’ve ever had a pistol you really, really like but unfortunately it’s only chambered in one caliber and only available in one size, you know the pain of having to switch to another pistol.

A modular design allows you to change any part of the pistol to whatever you need it to be. For the P250, initially released in 2007, that meant being able to swap out slides, pistol grip modules, and magazines. This was all due to the receiver being a “drop in” piece you can take out of the pistol grip module.

Sig Sauer P250 CompactThe same receiver could be used on different calibers, different slides, and different grip modules.

The P250 came in three basic flavors: full-size, compact, and sub-compact. It really doesn’t matter which one you get because, as I mentioned before, it’s modular.

I’ve tested the sub-compact of the P250. It was the first handgun I purchased after coming back to New Hampshire in 2013. I bought my P250 sub-compact used for $ 350. The P320 was widely available through 2014 and this caused P250 prices to crash even further down. Unfortunately, the P250 was a pearl before swine… Because I didn’t understand nearly as much about it as I do now. That’s why I’m making this article.

Dimensions At A Glance

  • Trigger: Double Action Only
  • Barrel Length: 3.6 in (91 mm)
  • Overall Length: 6.7 in (170 mm)
  • Overall Width: 1.1 in (28 mm)
  • Height: 4.7 in (119 mm)
  • Weight: 24.9 oz (706 g)
  • MSRP: It’s no longer in mainline production so you pretty much can only purchase them used. The going rate appears to be somewhere between $ 350 to $ 499.

The sub-compact model is very easy to conceal and is covered by most holster manufacturers — and it fits the same basic holster dimensions as the P320.

Caliber Exchange Kits Are The Way To Go

Caliber Exchange Kits are what Sig Sauer calls their slide assemblies, barrel, recoil spring and pin for the P250. The different caliber exchange kits allow you to switch between calibers and sizes pretty easily. When I picked up my sub-compact P250, I didn’t realize how modular its design was. I thought I was stuck just using it as a sub-compact and that was it.

I had never heard of modularity and had no inkling what the P250 could do.

I thought I was also stuck with just 9mm.

My P250 literally sat in a safe for a year while I dinked around with the Walther PPS, CZ-75D PCR, Glock 19, and a number of other pistols… All because I didn’t realize just how I could use it.

At a width of just over an inch, it meets the specs of what most concealed carriers prefer – about an inch. The reason why the inch spec seems so important, I think, is because after an inch and a half, I’ve noticed I print heavily unless I’m wearing thicker or loose clothing.

I carried the P250 on a number of occasions as a concealed carry pistol. With a standard capacity of 12 rounds, when chambered in 9mm, I felt confident that I had enough rounds to handle a situation.

The biggest complaint I have is the double action only firing mechanism. I’ve never been a fan. There is an incredibly long trigger pull. And because it’s DAO, there’s no real trigger reset. The hammer has to go all the way back and hit again in order to keep shooting.

The trigger pull was smooth. If it can’t be short and sweet, at least it was smooth. The slide assembly ran extremely well and recoil wasn’t an issue. The P250 was a heavier sub-compact than, for instance, my Walther PPS, but for my carry style, it really didn’t become a factor.

With The P320 Out, P250 Is Forgotten Treasure

Now that the P320 is widely available, the P250 has been nearly forgotten to the annuls of pistol history. That’s a shame. It’s not a bad little gun. But their lose can be your gain. Now that you know a bit more about its modularity, go pick up a full-size grip module and slide assembly and try out the full-size or compact version. Those use the same magazines as the P320 so I see no reason why not slide an extended 21-round magazine up in there and go to town on some targets at the range.

Added bonus: this is one of the few sub-compacts I’ve encountered that handles .40 S&W exceptionally well. I previously owned an M&P Shield chambered in .40 S&W and I was not a huge fan. Sadly, even though I hate DAO, this is one of the few pistols that handles larger caliber ammunition well.

Fair warning: If you don’t typically fire a DAO and then decide to go from your normal DA/SA or striker fire to this, give yourself a bit of adjustment time for the trigger travel.

If you find a P250 of any size — full-size, compact, or sub-compact — pick it up for cheap and use it as a beater gun at the range or an occasional concealed carry pistol. It’ll do the job.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Cryptocurrency in kilowatt hours: Counting the costs of anonymous transactions

The energy costs are not the only charges in a transaction: the bitcoin network itself levies a charge which, according to a blog from Valve, the gaming provider behind the Steam network, has skyrocketed from $ 0.20 in 2016 to $ 20 per transaction today

The post Cryptocurrency in kilowatt hours: Counting the costs of anonymous transactions appeared first on WeLiveSecurity


WeLiveSecurity