Posts Tagged ‘Carry’

postheadericon What You Need To Know About The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act Of 2017

This is a post from firearms legal expert Phil Nelsen of MyLegalHeat.com and is republished here with permission.

Have you heard there is new federal legislation that will allow someone with a concealed carry permit from one state to carry in all 50 states? It actually might not be as awesome as you have heard. The purpose of this article is to dispel some of the myths associated with this proposed legislation and give an update on its status.

What is the Law & What is the Status?

H.R. 38: Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 is a new iteration of a law that has been proposed several times over the past 6 years. In its most recent form it was introduced on January 03,

 

2017 by U.S. Representative Richard Hudson (NC-08). The NRA and other gun rights organizations have been outspoken in their support of this legislation. This week (December 6th) it was voted on by the US House of Representatives and passed by a 231/198 margin. Although it has cleared the House it still has many steps to clear before it becomes law. A brief summary of the remaining procedural process is below:

  1. It will go to a Senate subcommittee to approve their version of the legislation; then
  2. It will be scheduled for a floor vote in the Senate, with the potential for a filibuster; then
  3. It would go to a joint conference committee and the two bills (House & Senate) would be “reconciled” by the committee; then
  4. The reconciled bill will need to be voted on again by both the House and Senate.  Many bills die at this stage as the two separate pieces of legislation from the two houses are often so different that they cannot be reconciled; then
  5. For the final step it goes to President Trump’s desk, who has indicated he would sign similar laws in the past.
The house version has combined two separate bills, one on national reciprocity and the FIX NICS bill.  The FIX NICS bill has widespread support among Democrats, whereas the  Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act has significantly less.

Largely due to the social media buzz surrounding it, many people in our training classes are misinformed on many aspects of this potential law (many people we speak with believe it is already a law, which is dangerous). We have received hundreds of emails and phone calls from past students asking about the “new law” and the amount of misinformation we’ve heard is alarming to us. There are some legitimate misunderstandings out there about the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, and we want to help clarify a few important points.

What Will the Law Do? 

Many people we speak with believe this legislation would make it so one permit would be valid in all 50 states, like a driver’s license. In fact Congressman Hudson’s own website says the following regarding the law:

“Your driver’s license works in every state, so why doesn’t your concealed carry permit?” (source)

That is absolutely not what this law will do, however, and it is important to understand what the law actually says.

The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 is intended to “amend title 18, United States Code, to provide a means by which non- residents of a State whose residents may carry concealed firearms may also do so in the State.”

Subsection (a) states that

a person who is not prohibited by Federal law from possessing, transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm, who is carrying a valid identification document containing a photograph of the person, and who is carrying a valid license or permit which is issued pursuant to the law of a State and which permits the person to carry a concealed firearm or is entitled to carry a concealed firearm in the State in which the person resides, may possess or carry a concealed handgun (other than a machinegun or destructive device) … in any State

AWESOME RIGHT?!? As long as I have a photo ID & concealed permit (or am from a constitutional carry state) then I’ll be able to carry in any state, what’s wrong with that???

The problem is the text of the proposed law doesn’t stop at that point. If it did, I would agree it would be a great law. Instead it goes on to create two very distinct problems.

What Are The Problems With The Law?

Problem #1: A permit holder would only be able to carry in a state that, “has a statute that allows residents of the State to obtain licenses or permits to carry concealed firearms” OR “does not prohibit the carrying of concealed firearms by residents of the State for lawful purposes.”

  • The problem with the above text is that  it provides a strong incentive for restrictive states (like Maryland, New Jersey, Hawaii, New York & California) to prohibit concealed carry altogether. Think about it, when faced with the following two choices, do you think that New Jersey and California (who are historically very restrictive in issuing concealed permits) are going to (1) open the floodgates to every freedom loving American to carry a gun, OR  (2) simply prohibit concealed carry altogether, thus exempting themselves from the National Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act. If this law passes, reasonable minds could agree we would see at least the following states take steps to completely prohibit concealed carry: California, New Jersey, New York, Maryland, Hawaii, Delaware, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. In sum, we would see a regression in the amount of states that allow concealed carry. Naturally residents of those states could then take their case to the courts and hopefully we would see the state and federal courts rule favorably in some of those jurisdictions, but sadly as we’ve seen over the past few years, that is far from a sure bet.

Problem #2: “This [law] shall not be construed to supersede or limit the laws of any State that—(1) permit private persons or entities to prohibit or restrict the possession of concealed firearms on their property; or (2) prohibit or restrict the possession of firearms on any State or local government property, installation, building, base, or park.”

  • What this means is that those middle-of-the-road states (like Oregon, Washington, Illinois and South Carolina) which likely won’t decide to eliminate concealed carry altogether, but also don’t necessarily want millions of visitors carrying guns in their state, will likely make it SUBSTANTIALLY more difficult to carry a gun in their state. States like Oregon and Illinois (among others) have historically been very opposed to granting non-resident carry rights within their state. Instead of suddenly opening the doors for everyone to carry, we will likely see state legislatures tightening the areas within the state where you are allowed to carry through increased prohibited areas. Advancements that took years to accomplish could potentially vanish overnight due to an overly paranoid media frenzy.

Would Any State Permit Work, or Would I Need My Home State Permit? 

There has been a fair amount of debate about this question. When discussing what permits would allows someone to carry in all states, the law say that a person must have a, “permit which is issued pursuant to the law of a State and which permits the person to carry a concealed firearm or is entitled to carry a concealed firearm in the State in which the person resides.”

This wording is more complicated than it first appears. What this means is that your home state permit will always satisfy this requirement, as it entitles you to “carry a concealed firearm in the state in which [you] reside.” Many people who live in restrictive states, like Maryland or New Jersey, have been asking if they can get an easier to obtain out of state permit (such as Utah or Virginia) and still be able to carry in all states. The answer, under the currently worded law, is maybe. Unless the permit you have allows you to carry in your home state, or your state has constitutional carry, the wording of the current law is somewhat awkward regarding non-resident permits. It appears their intent was to allow you to obtain a permit from any state, but if that is the case the language of the law should be updated to unambiguously state that.

In Summary:

There are some positives to this law. I like that concealed carry is being discussed on a national stage and I am glad it is making people more cognizant of the very complicated patchwork of gun laws we have in America. I also like that the law does away with the crazy patchwork of laws regulating magazine capacity (it allows “any magazine for use in a handgun and any ammunition loaded into the handgun or its magazine”), and it explicitly allows for carry on certain federal land (such as National Parks and Army Corp of Engineers property).

However, I think this legislation is badly in need of refinement if it is to accomplish what we all want it to accomplish. To me, a much better option would be to pursue a judicial remedy for the right to bear arms much like the NRA and the SAF achieved for the right to keep arms (click here for a summary of the difference). However, if we are going to attack this issue through legislation it needs to be done properly. As most are aware, Legal Heat is the largest provider of concealed carry training in America, having certified over 150,000 people to obtain concealed carry permits. We are also the publishers of a 50 state gun law book app that is used by hundreds of thousands of gun owners to navigate gun laws in all 50 states. The attorneys at Legal Heat have also worked on several pieces of concealed carry legislation and would be more than happy to act in an advisory role for Congressman Hudson or anyone else involved in this legislation. We want this law to pass, we just want it to be amended slightly before passing.

For the first time in our history the question before us now is not IF we can pass nationwide reciprocity legislation, but instead HOW such a law should be strategically handled. We are in an exciting time for American gun rights. Legal Heat is very excited about the potential to see quick and decisive progress in the fight for the individual right to keep and bear arms. We will continue to stand on the front lines of this issue by training tens of thousands of Americans each year. If you are interested in attending a training class click here to find a course in your area. 

For updates on this proposed legislation and any other gun related issues please follow us on Facebook.

Knowledge is power. Make sure to share this article. 


Phil Nelsen is a nationally recognized firearms law attorney, expert witness, college professor, author and co-founder of Legal Heat, the nation’s largest firearms training firm and exclusive national CCW training provider to Cabela’s.

Legal Heat offers CCW classes nationwide, and also publishes the industry leading Legal Heat 50 State Guide to Firearm Laws and Regulations which can be downloaded on iTunes, GooglePlay and Kindle App stores. You can purchase the paperback version of the Legal Heat 50 State Guide or sign up for a class at https://mylegalheat.com

Concealed Nation

postheadericon *WATCH* Numerous Examples: Carry With A Round In The Chamber

There is sometimes a debate about carrying with a round in the chamber, as some people don’t because they are just starting out. While we want people to be comfortable with the firearm they are carrying, it should be a considering factor to carry at all…

In other words, carry the way you feel is best for you, but also be mindful of the fact that, if needed, you may not have time to rack that slide. And even if you do, you may find yourself with a malfunction.

Watch the video above which shoes numerous examples of both chambered carry and not chambered. The differences can be staggering in the end.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Sheriff Urges Citizens To Carry Firearms Following Texas Mass Shooting

POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA — Sheriff Grady Judd tweeted that their county offers active shooter scenario training shortly after the massacre at a Texas church, and encouraged citizens to attend and to arm themselves if they are legally able to do so.

Sheriff Judd has made headlines in the past, and isn’t afraid to speak his mind on topics that are important to him. The video above shows just how Judd operates, and of course you have people who both agree and disagree with him.

But on the topic of concealed carry, I’d bet that he has most people in his corner. His active approach to getting citizens their concealed carry permits –and important training– are something that we would love to see across the Country.

So regardless of where you live, take Sheriff Judd’s advice if you don’t already have your permit and/or training: Get the permit, get armed, get trained, and be prepared.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Concealed Carry And The Holiday Season – When Waistlines Meet Waistbands, Part I

As a concealed carrier, calories count. An inside the waistband holster with a concealed carry micro-compact or sub-compact pistol is sure to add at least an inch and a quarter to the waistline. When that competes with Aunt May’s turkey, hilarity ensues.

What are some holiday considerations you take as a concealed carrier? There’s more than meets the eye. In this first part of a two part series, we’ll discuss some real things to think about this holiday season — and why it’s best to start planning now.

Fat Shaming The Holster

No one forced that midnight slice of apple pie. It happened on its own. And next day Thanksgiving sandwiches? Delicious but damaging.

Anything that hurts your waistline will also hurt your concealed carry practice. If your trousers are uncomfortable to wear, your trousers plus a holster plus a gun will make for a downright excruciating day.

The easiest thing to do is admit you know yourself. If you typically put on weight during the holiday season — not at all uncommon — then plan for your clothing accordingly. Pants that are normally tight while you’re carrying concealed will be doubly so with your love handles overflowing them. No need to muffin top when you can simply switch into a pair of trousers that accommodate your “winter weight”.

Above all, don’t blame your gun and holster. If you need to, switch down to a micro-compact or sub-compact if you typically carry a compact. Even a change in a half an inch on the waistline can create a much more comfortable situation.

Tips To Win The Battle of the Bulge

  • Stick to a diet that accounts for larger-than-average holiday meals.
  • If you know you’re going to indulge, plan on wearing pants that are a bit more accommodating.

Don’t Be The Road Warrior

Unfortunately, it’s not like danger takes a holiday. A lot of people feel a heightened sense of stress during the holidays. Mix that with the demands of family, busy occasions, and the rest and there are all of the ingredients for flare ups of things like road rage, heated arguments, and unnecessary conduct.

Any situation you have the opportunity to walk away from is a guaranteed win. There’s no “if”s about it. When you encounter someone who is being overly aggressive, it’s far better to walk or drive away. If you feel threatened — but not in the immediate, lethal variety — call the police and let them deal with it. Those poor souls signed up to deal with every holiday nutjob in their jurisdiction — you didn’t.

Tips to Avoid The Holiday Hassle

  • Walk away from an argument
  • Don’t pull over to handle crazy, erratic drivers
  • Call the police if you feel a situation is truly escalating

Home For The Holidays

If you’re someone who has to travel to see relatives, make sure you bone up on the law before crossing state lines… Even if you follow the philosophy, ‘they can’t stop you if they can’t see you.’

All it takes is one routine traffic stop by a patrolman to turn your holiday season into a lengthy, costly trial.

You’re not the bad guy. You’re not the one who came up with the dumb laws regarding 2A and concealed carry. But you are a responsible citizen. If you have a family, they’re depending on you to be there for them. You can’t afford to get hauled off by the police because you carried a gun across state lines into — for example — New Jersey or New York. Just don’t do it.

Tips For Crossing State Lines While Carrying Concealed

  • Know the laws of the state you’re visiting
  • Know if that state honors your Right to Carry
  • Keep it concealed at all times

In Part II of this article, we’ll discuss a few more factors that every concealed carrier should consider when getting ready for the holiday season. As always, stay safe, keep it concealed, and carry everyday, everywhere.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Why You Need A Pocket Pistol, Even If You Don’t Pocket Carry

By Salvatore via USA Carry

I get it. Carry the biggest gun you can. I am a believer in that. I carry a double-stack autoloader the majority of the time. I find that most people can carry a more formidable gun than they think and I encourage all to do so. However, most of us lead lives in which we can’t always carry a full-size or compact handgun. We may frequently have the need for a very small and concealable firearm, and a pocket gun is better than having no gun under such circumstances.

If you must spend time in environments where you need to dress in ways that make concealment difficult or if you spend time in environments where you absolutely can’t afford to print, then you will not always be able to carry your primary handgun. For those of you who never need to dress in anything other than your 5.11 pants and always carry a service pistol and at least two spare magazines, good for you. For those of you that actually work in the real world, you may need a pocket gun for certain times, even if you don’t pocket carry it.

Small guns are a two-edged sword. They are so convenient to carry that you may find you are content to wear your small frame revolver or 380 auto instead of strapping on your more capable gun. This practice is not ideal, as carrying more gun is always better. However, the real benefit of a small gun is that you can go armed at times when you otherwise could not if you only maintain larger handguns in your lineup. Many need a small gun to cover those times that don’t permit your usual carry gun, which may be quite often depending on your lifestyle. If you are not already squared away with a deep concealment pocket gun, consider the following:

The Guns for the Role

I often refer to exceedingly small handguns as pocket guns, even though you obviously don’t have to carry them in a pocket, and these are very small firearms that can be worn in a variety of places on the body and go unnoticed. A lot of people have different opinions regarding what really constitutes a pocket gun. Some claim that they can carry a Glock 26 or similar sized double-stack auto in their hip pocket. Most can’t do this. Even the small single-stack 9mm autos tend to be too large for pocket carry for most people. The two classes of guns that tend to be ideal pocket guns are the small auto loaders typically chambered in 380 acp or the small-frame revolvers. Again, even if you don’t pocket carry, you will find that these two categories of handgun can be carried easier than most else. These firearms work for deep concealment and also serve many well as backup guns when carried as a second handgun.

While many do not consider small auto loaders chambered in 380 adequate defensive tools they are far better than being unarmed if they are the only size gun you can carry. My personal preference for deep concealment is a small-frame revolver. Guns like the Smith and Wesson J Frames and the Ruger LCR represent this class. The even smaller 380 autos, typified by guns like the Ruger LCP or the Smith and Wesson Bodyguard, are indeed smaller yet and even easier to carry. The revolver has the benefit of being chambered in a more powerful cartridge and being generally more reliable. You need to fully test the reliability of the small autos but if you have one that is truly reliable these make good deep concealment guns.

Where will you Carry It?

The next question to ask yourself: where will you carry your deep concealment gun? I tend to suggest minimizing your different carry locations because in a time of stress you will instinctively reach for your gun in the location it is most often carried. However, you obviously may need to carry a deeply concealed firearm differently. Some common methods for carrying a small gun are in the pocket, on the ankle, or in a belly band. There are also a variety of deeply concealable holsters available that are designed to fall below the waistline and some folks like these options.

Of course, you may be able to carry your small gun in the same way you carry your larger handgun but the sheer size difference may allow you to carry the small weapon when unable to use your primary. Consistency of carry location is very important and you should strive to minimize how many ways in which you carry your firearm. Being able to accommodate any dress or situation while wearing your gun in the same location is great, if you can do it.

My personal choice for deep concealment is carrying a small-frame revolver in a belly band under my clothing. The gun rides on strong-side-hip, like my usual carry mode. This setup works excellent under tucked-in formal shirts, which is the primary dress limitation that prompts me to sometimes need this deep concealment setup. The difference, however, is that the tucked-in shirt needs to be ripped up and out of the waistband in order to access the gun, so it is a slower presentation than my normal carry mode.

You will often find that the better the concealment the less accessible the gun is. This is the tradeoff for remaining armed. I have also utilized ankle carry and pocket carry in the past, but seem to have settled on the belly band solution for such deep concealment needs. Figuring out an alternate deep concealment carry mode takes time and experimentation. While I most often carry a substantial handgun and recommend the same I will take a pocket gun over not gun any day. This is the purpose such tiny weapons serve; they offer an alternative to no gun.

A pocket gun, whether actually pocket carried or not, is a valuable weapon to have in your arsenal. A gun that is generally small enough to pocket carry proves truly small enough to disappear on the human body. These little guns are difficult to shoot well and they are far less capable than a full-size or compact pistol but they facilitate carry when otherwise you would be unarmed. Carry the most capable gun you can at all times that you can, but if restricted to a pocket gun or nothing the pocket gun is the much better option.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon TTAG Owner Forced To Leave Restaurant, Because Concealed Carry

Robert over at TTAG recently shared a story about one of his favorite establishments and their dislike of guns. Well, maybe it’s not his favorite, but apparently they have some bread that will keep you coming back.

In any event, Robert was asked to leave by the owner –indirectly– by way of calling the police to inform them that someone was carrying a concealed firearm inside their restaurant. They either saw that he was printing, or remembered him and assumed that he had a firearm on him as he sipped his coffee.

Either way, here’s the story:


So there I was, eating the world’s best ham sandwich at Austin’s Baguette et Chocolat, when two cops entered the patisserie and approached the counter. I thought nothing of it. Neither did Heidi. And then my spidey senses began to tingle . . .

Cop one was in a quiet conference with the owner, who stood behind the counter. Cop two positioned himself against a wall, arms crossed, staring across the room. Not at me and Heidi. Across the width of the room.

My first thought: it’s an immigration issue. My second thought: that’s stupid. They’re not Immigration officers. And B&C’s employees don’t seem like the undocumented sort, if you know what I mean.

As Iris Dement recommends, I let the mystery be.

To the point where I asked the not-so-dynamic duo if they were staying dry (a day after Harvey whacked Houston) as I returned to the counter and bought a cup of coffee. They nodded without any apparent understanding or bemusement — not an entirely unfamiliar response to my “clever” comments.

At some point, officer one approached our table from behind.

“Excuse me sir, are you armed?”

As Hunter Thompson reminds us, when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. In this case — as in all of my various interactions with the constabulary — I became slow-moving, polite and stupid.

“What?” I asked, coffee in mid-air.

I turned to look at cop one, surveyed my surroundings and tried to guess what was about to happen.

“Are you armed?” he repeated.

My ability to answer this simple binary question was short-circuited by the cop’s blue eyes. Paul Newman didn’t have eyes that blue, and his eyes made the blue sky green with envy.

“Yes,” I answered, gathering my wits enough to realize my mistake.

When Texas passed licensed open carry, Baguette et Chocolat put up the requisite big-ass, door-mounted signage banning both open and concealed carry. I shared my disappointment with the manager and politely informed her that she’d lost my custom, and the custom of my TTAG staff.

And then . . . bread. Call me a hypocrite, accuse me of giving aid and comfort to the enemy, but B&C’s baguettes were a siren song this gun rights absolutist couldn’t resist.

Prior to that fateful afternoon, I stashed my gat in the car before entering the patisserie. That day, though, I forgot. I was wearing my Wilson Combat EDC X-9 in a Kydex holster under a T shirt. I was barely printing. But apparently enough to trigger the owner’s PC hoplophobia.

“Did you see the signs?” the officer asked.

“I thought they were just thirty-ought seven signs,” I replied, reckoning that both “no” and “oops, I forgot” wouldn’t cut it.

The officer’s blue eyes clouded with confusion. Clearly, he had no idea what I was talking about.

“Well the law’s always changing,” he said, suddenly trying to help me out. Calm me down. Prepare me for a ticket. Cover the fact that he didn’t know what the hell I was talking about. Something. “Have a look at the signs.”

Seriously? He wanted me to get up, go outside and read the signs? I glanced at his partner. He was deep into his bad-cop-at-a-distance, waiting-to-see-if-the-perp-complies routine.

OK then.

“I’m sorry officer,” I said after pretending to read the signs and re-entering the cafe. “I thought it was no open carry.”

I nodded at Heidi, put on my hat, made another apology and exited B&C stage right.

And that was that.

My bad, right? But I’m still annoyed that the owner called the cops.

I was a regular customer. I’d just bought $ 30 worth of food. I was with an attractive young lady. I was dressed well. I was calm and polite to his staff. All the owner had to do: ask me to leave and/or disarm.

I suspect I’m persona non grata at Baguette et Chocolat as a result. Luckily, I’m now on the ketosis diet. Even so, it’s a grieving process; I’m in the depression phase. Or maybe it’s just the lack of carbs.

One more thing . . .

Heidi and I were enjoying each other’s company in B&C for a good twenty minutes before the officers rolled up. I wonder if the owner ever considered how long it would take the cops to respond to an armed robbery or other violent incident. Probably not.


End scene.

It’s an interesting encounter, and I sit here wondering how I’d react in this situation. I still don’t know, but I’d probably wind up talking to the police outside a little more to dig a little deeper about how they feel about it. Regardless, if a private business doesn’t want you there with a firearm, that is their choice.

As a concealed carrier, what do you think about this encounter?

Concealed Nation

postheadericon This Young Woman Used A Concealed Carry Method That’s… Not Recommended

By John Boch via The Truth About Guns

Deep concealment took on a whole new meaning in McLean County, Illinois on Friday. Police stopped a 20-year-old Missouri woman, Amika Witt (above), for doing 90 on I-55 at 5:00a.m. During the traffic stop, police became suspicious. During a search, cops found heroin in Ms Witt’s bra and Ecstasy in some other unspecified location on her person. But the surprises didn’t stop there.

Later, when corrections staff processed her into the county jail, they discovered a fully loaded Kimber CDP .380 pistol concealed in her vagina.

While one might think vaginal carry would be dangerous (not to mention awfully uncomfortable), it does provide deep concealment. At the same time, it probably doesn’t do so much for the gun’s finish.

In fact, there are probably lots of good reasons not to tuck a firearm into any body cavity. Especially a pistol with some sharp edges like the Kimber .380.

As a result of her failed concealment efforts, Ms. Witt now faces a slew of bonus criminal charges.

The Bloomington Pantagraph has the details:

Witt is charged with armed violence for possessing a weapon during the alleged commission of a felony and while in possession of drugs, and possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver.

A passenger in the car, Clinton McDonald, 29, of Springfield, Mo., was charged with unlawful possession of heroin with intent to deliver the drug, and unlawful possession of Ecstasy.

After Witt was taken to the McLean County jail, a female correctional officer found the Kimber .380 caliber handgun inside the suspect’s body, said Roberts. The gun had a fully loaded magazine and “a bullet in the chamber ready to fire,” said the prosecutor.

Fortunately, Ms. Witt didn’t suffer an accidental discharge in her clandestine pistol-packing. We’d probably name her our irresponsible gun owner of the day, but she has enough to deal with now with all of those felony charges. Just to be safe, though, someone should really remind her of the first rule of gun safety: never point a firearm in an unsafe direction.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon NYC Not Renewing Concealed Carry Permits, And No Reason Is Given

By John Farnam from www.defense-training.com

I conducted a Defensive Handgun Course recently for a group of students, all of whom live and work in NYC. We did the Course itself at an outdoor range in NJ. Several of my students (via past political connections) actually had CCW permits issued by the NYPD, nearly impossible to get, but they were very concerned about keeping them.

The sub-department that issues these permits has been fraught with scandal, one right after another. Several higher-ups have been indicted for accepting bribes [to issue permits]. Corruption is rampant and decades old.

Reacting to criticism, the current mayor’s predictable reaction has been to direct the NYPD to even further reduce the minuscule number of permits currently valid.

Hence, many NYC permit-holders, including several of my students, have received letters indicating that their city-issued CCW permits will not be renewed. No reason given. No wrongdoing, real or imagined, on the part of disenfranchised CCW permit holders.Their precipitous castration is completely arbitrary.

Those of us who live in states where CCW permits are easy to get (in fact, taken for granted) find the degrading contempt in which NYC residents are held by the city government (all liberal Democrats) astonishing, and frightening, particularly since NY’s current governor and NYC’s current mayor have both indicated a desire to run for president.

My students, all successful professionals, expressed an abiding contempt for NYC’s entrenched liberals, and pointed out that they stay in power via:

1) Imposing guns laws so voluminous, incomprehensible, arbitrarily enforced, and requiring paperwork that constitutes a full-time job in itself, that being “law-abiding” in NYC is probably impossible. In any event, one could never know if he was of not. What are supposed to be “rights” (and are for the rest of us) in NYC are “privileges,” enjoyed only by the ruling elite and their supporters.

The liberal ruling elite can thus terrorize citizens who dare speak-out against them, by withholding “privileges” and arbitrarily charging them with technical offenses. The euphemism is “selective enforcement.” That means their political opponents must exactingly obey the law (as noted above, an impossibility), but they and their supporters don’t.

2) The maintenance and expansion of a vast and permanent “underclass,” (including many violent criminals whom liberals put to good use in coercing unarmed political opponents) from which there is no escape, and whose votes can be dependably purchased with taxpayer dollars, or terrorized out of them.

Among liberals, the foregoing represents “The Golden Rule.”

About John Farnam & Defense Training International, Inc

As a defensive weapons and tactics instructor John Farnam will urge you, based on your own beliefs, to make up your mind in advance as to what you would do when faced with an imminent and unlawful lethal threat. You should, of course, also decide what preparations you should make in advance, if any. Defense Training International wants to make sure that their students fully understand the physical, legal, psychological, and societal consequences of their actions or inactions.

It is our duty to make you aware of certain unpleasant physical realities intrinsic to the Planet Earth. Mr Farnam is happy to be your counselor and advisor. Visit: www.defense-training.com

Concealed Nation

postheadericon VIDEO: So, What Do You Carry? Do You Carry Uncommon?

When I tell folks that I write for a website dedicated to concealed carry and responsible armament, they will ask me, more often than not:

“So, what do you carry?”

Of course, I then have to answer them with an obnoxious answer: I carry a relatively obscure, semi-compact handgun that is rarely carried based off of another “path less traveled by” firearm that’s not very often carried.

So the question I get all the time is, “What’s a Tristar T-100?”

That’s a completely valid question, and it brings up a really important point — there are tons of awesome firearms out there, and often we don’t pay attention to the less mainline firearms series.

I thought I would take a moment to put out a video that YouTuber Sootch00 made and published a little over two years ago — it’s very well done, and gives great information on a firearm that, in my humble opinion, really ought to be a better-known defensive tool and fun shoot.

Even more than that — I want to ask you, the audience-at-large — what’s that handgun or long gun that you keep or love that is a little less common? Please let us know in the comments section on Facebook and Twitter!

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Summer Concealed Carry

By Sam Hoober via USA Carry

Summer concealed carry can be a different animal than carry during the rest of the year. It isn’t as easy for a lot of people to keep concealment or carry comfortably due to the increase in temperatures and reduced layering.

How do you overcome these things? You wouldn’t want to stop carrying during the hot parts of the year due to discomfort; the point of having a CCW pistol, license and so on is to be armed as often as possible.

Since summer is just about here at the time of this writing, here are some tips that will help you overcome the challenges of summertime carry.

Address How You Dress For Summertime Concealed Carry

One of the areas that may require a little attention for summer concealed carry is your clothing. How a lot of people carry is with an IWB holster with an untucked shirt. Now, if you can effectively conceal with a T-shirt you don’t really have anything to worry about and can carry on – pun intended – as normal.

Not everyone gets off that easy, though.

Some people, due to a number of factors like body shape, dress habits and/or dress code for work, can’t wear just a t-shirt. What, then is a person to do?

If your job mandates a button-up shirt (say you work in an office that runs on the stricter side of business casual) an easy fix is to wear an untucked short-sleeve button-up or polo. (Top tip: seersucker shirts are ridiculously comfortable in summertime.) If normal tees just aren’t doing it, selecting the next size up (so long as it doesn’t appear suspicious) or a tall size may turn the trick.

Take care to select shirts that fit a little loose, which can get a bit hard as slim-fit is the fashion of today. Not only will this aid in concealment, a little breathing room actually feels better in the heat.

Granted, if your workplace (or personal sense of style) demands you wear a tucked shirt at all times…carry as normal, because there’s nothing to help you clothing-wise. Granted, a sweat-wicking Under Armour (or similar) undershirt may be a good idea.

Get A Summer Concealed Carry Gun

Another strategy some people employ for summer concealed carry is to have a summer gun. What some people look forward to in winter is the ability to conceal their favorite full-size gun (1911 guys, we’re looking at you – and this writer and his R1 are guilty as all get out on that score) with the extra layers concealing that high-ride OWB so very well, but when it starts to heat up…that’s when the single-stack subcompact comes out of the safe and goes in the waistband.

Then again, some people just buy an easy gun to conceal and carry that all the time, which is arguably the better idea…but c’est la vie.

Slim, subcompact single-stack plastic fantastics, snubbie revolvers and pocket rocket .380 pistols are all popular summer guns because they’re easier to conceal with fewer layers. There are also a good number of double-stack compacts out there that are just as easy to concealed carry on the daily.

A lighter gun will sit easier, a smaller gun will conceal more easily. A smallish, light pistol conceals AND carries easily. Therefore, consider a down-sized gun if you don’t have one.

Ditch The Leather In Hot Weather

avoid summer leather concealed carry

Yes, I know, I work for a holster company and this may sound like a plug but anyone who has carried with a leather IWB when it’s 90+ degrees or hotter out will probably agree with me that holster selection for hot weather makes a huge difference. The peanut gallery can sound off in the comments; maybe I’ll even read them.

Holster materials and holster construction make a huge difference. Leather doesn’t breathe as well as other fabrics or holster materials and it will make you sweat. A lot.

If you must stick with a hide of some sort, opt for suede in the summer months. It breathes a bit more, but can also soak up a lot of sweat so keep an eye out for that.

For summertime carry, you’ll want to find an IWB holster that’s thin enough to not turn your waistband into a swamp, but secure enough for you to not have to worry about it. A number of companies out there are making IWB holsters backed with neoprene along with other non-traditional materials that can make for much easier carry in hot weather. (Yes, that includes Alien Gear but there are plenty more besides us.) So options for summer carry holsters abound.

Some people opt for pocket carry for this reason during the hot season, but be sure to carry with a pocket holster as trigger guard protection is essential.

These tips will help out during the hot months, which are – at the time of this writing – incipient. Happy carrying.

Concealed Nation