Posts Tagged ‘developed’

postheadericon Industroyer: ICS protocols were developed decades ago with no security in mind

Senior ESET malware researcher Robert Lipovsky discusses Industroyer, the biggest threat to Industrial Control Systems (ICS) since Stuxnet.

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postheadericon Digital divergence: Microsoft poll shows striking differences in attitudes toward technology between Internet users in developing and developed countries

DAVOS, Switzerland — Jan. 19, 2015 — A survey of Internet users around the world conducted by Microsoft Corp. shows an overwhelming majority believes personal technology is making the world a better place to live and has vastly improved how they shop, work, learn and generally get things done.

There are nonetheless notable differences in certain attitudes toward personal technology between developed and developing economies. Developing countries express widespread enthusiasm about the benefits of technology — including its impact on social bonds, the sharing economy and personal fitness — while developed countries, where technology is more ubiquitous, express concerns about emerging issues.

Microsoft unveiled the results of its new survey Monday in advance of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The report, titled “Views from Around the Globe: 2nd Annual Poll on How Personal Technology Is Changing Our Lives,” encompasses the views of 12,002 Internet users in 12 countries. This is the second year in a row that the company has commissioned the study.

“Internet users overwhelmingly say that personal technology is making the world better and more vital,” said Mark Penn, Microsoft executive vice president and chief strategy officer. “But there is a digital divergence in the attitudes of Internet users in developing and developed countries regarding how technology will affect them going forward.”

Among the overall findings of the poll are these:

  • Majorities in all 12 countries surveyed think personal technology has had a positive impact on their ability to find more affordable products and start new businesses. They also say it has benefited social activism, as well as innovation in business.
  • A majority in nearly all of the countries thinks personal technology has improved productivity.
  • Compared with last year’s results, more respondents said technology has had a positive impact on transportation and literacy, while fewer said it has benefited social bonds, personal freedom and political expression. Concern about technology’s impact on privacy also jumped significantly.
  • Indeed, in 11 of the 12 countries, most Internet users said technology’s effect on privacy was mostly negative. Majorities in every country but India and Indonesia also said current legal protections for users of personal technology were insufficient, and only in those two countries did most people feel fully aware of the types of personal information collected about them.

As previously noted, attitudes toward technology in developing and developed economies diverged in several key emerging areas:

  • Sixty percent of Internet users in developing countries, compared with only 36 percent of people in developed countries, think personal technology has had a positive impact on social bonds.
  • Fifty-nine percent of people in developing countries think technology-enabled, sharing-economy services, such as Uber and Airbnb, are better for consumers than traditional services, such as taxis and hotels. By contrast, only 33 percent of people in developed countries think the new services are better for consumers.
  • Only 59 percent of people in developed countries, compared with 85 percent in developing countries, say they are interested in working in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. And notably, while 77 percent of women in developing countries feel encouraged to work in STEM fields, only 46 percent of women in developed countries do.

The poll was conducted between Dec. 17, 2014, and Jan. 1, 2015, and surveyed Internet users in Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey and the U.S.

The results were then weighted based on the size of the Internet populations in each of the 12 countries. The full findings can be found at http://blogs.microsoft.com/?p=45963.

Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT”) is the worldwide leader in software, services, devices and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential.

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

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postheadericon Microsoft releases global survey revealing widespread belief in developing and developed nations that personal technology is transforming lives for the better

DAVOS, Switzerland — Jan. 24, 2014 — A new global survey of Internet users conducted by Microsoft Corp. reveals distinct regional findings and differing viewpoints between the developed and developing world. However, overwhelmingly the more than 10,000 people surveyed from 10 nations said they embrace personal technology, particularly in emerging markets, and see it as the foundation of innovation and economic empowerment.

Microsoft unveiled the results of its new survey today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in the report titled, “Views from Around the Globe: How Personal Technology is Changing Our Lives.”

Mark Penn, Microsoft Executive Vice President of Advertising and Strategy, presented the poll’s findings followed by a panel discussion moderated by award-winning journalist and author Maria Bartiromo. The panel included Marc R. Benioff, chairman and CEO, Salesforce.com; Maurice Lévy, chairman and CEO, Publicis Group; Bill McDermott, co-CEO, SAP; Alan Murray, president, Pew Research Center; and former U.S. Treasury Secretary and current Charles W. Elliot university professor, Harvard University, Lawrence H. Summers.

“Whether you live in a world capital or a remote village, personal technology is seen as empowering and as a vehicle to individual economic growth,” Penn said. “Despite varying rates of personal technology adoption and cultural differences, there is an overwhelming sense globally that improvements are being experienced across the board.”

Among the key findings of the study are these:

• A majority of the people surveyed around the world believe that personal technology has the most positive impact on innovation in business and empowering people to start a new business.

• People surveyed in developing countries — especially Brazil, Russia, India and China — believe that personal technology is creating job opportunities and helping bridge economic gaps.

• People in China say that personal technology has positively impacted personal freedom more than people in any other country surveyed.

• Those in developing countries — especially India — say that personal technology is improving education, health and healthcare.

• In Brazil, people say that personal technology had a strong impact on arts and culture.

• In China and India, they say their quality of life has improved due to personal technology.

Although personal technology was seen overwhelmingly as a positive force in both developed and developing countries, there were concerns that focused on personal safety and security, family bonds, and, most significantly, privacy. Interestingly, the survey found that the developing countries are more willing to trade privacy for security. Despite privacy concerns, however, nearly three-quarters of parents around the world want their children to have more, not less, access to personal technology. This is particularly true in developing countries, where parents are especially supportive of increased access to technology. Opinions are mixed in developed countries, where more parents feel there should be limits to technology access.

About the poll

The Microsoft poll was conducted between Dec. 26, 2013, and Jan. 3, 2014, and surveyed 10,009 Internet users in the United States, France, Brazil, Russia, China, India, Japan, Germany, Mexico and Turkey. The results were then weighted based on the size of the Internet populations in each of the 10 countries. The full survey findings and comprehensive analysis of the poll can be found at http://blogs.technet.com/b/microsoft_blog/archive/2014/01/23/personal-technology-is-changing-lives-around-the-world-what-we-learned-from-talking-to-10-000-people-in-10-countries.aspx.

About Microsoft

Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT”) is the worldwide leader in software, services and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential.

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://www.microsoft.com/news. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://www.microsoft.com/news/contactpr.mspx.

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