Posts Tagged ‘Owner’

postheadericon What To Do If You Get Called Out By Another Gun Owner

What you don’t know can hurt you. It’s a simple truth that we gun owners can become hardened to. The toughest pill to swallow is when someone calls you out for something and they’re right.

In the interest of saying I’m not immune, I’ll relay a little story.

One time I was taking an AR-15 rifle course with a bunch of other guys with a mix of different backgrounds. During this particular portion of the course, we were firing from the 15 yard line and then walking down to our targets to figure out our zero.

Two things happened to me during this course:

#1: I never used a scope on an AR-15 platform.

By this point, I had only ever used iron sights or, on a few occasions, red dot optics.

The scope I mounted wasn’t mounted correctly. But I couldn’t know what I didn’t know. And being stubborn, I didn’t ask for help. Unsurprisingly, my shot groups were all over the place as my scope bounced around between shots.

One of the other students in the class noticed I hadn’t affixed the scope correctly and called me out about it. He was polite but he noticed I hadn’t done something correctly and it was affecting my performance. So he volunteered to help and show me how to identify the problem and correct it.

#2: I’m a lefty.

The range safety officer instructed us to lock the bolt to the rear and sling our rifles behind us when we walked down to our targets.

The way my rifle hung behind me, the slide lock kept pressing against my back, causing the bolt to go home.

This understandably made the other participants nervous. No one likes to be walking up to the target while on the line with complete strangers and hear a bolt carrier group slam home.

And, after it happened, I’d obviously want to rack and lock the slide to the rear.

This didn’t help the situation at all. The range safety officer called me out on the bolt slamming home and told me if I couldn’t keep it locked, I’d need to leave it back at the firing line with the bolt locked to the rear, ejection port facing up.

And that’s what I ended up having to do.

I didn’t like being called out but the range safety officer was right. And I needed to respect my other fellow students as well as the range safety personnel.

Is it embarrassing getting called out on the range or in the real-world? Yeah. It sucks.

However, when the person calling you out has a point, it’s time to put the ego aside and do what needs to be done. A simple acknowledgement of, “I see what you mean” or “thank you for letting me know. I’ll get that fixed” can help allay any hard feelings and show that you intend to follow through.

Of course, it helps when the person calling you out is polite and direct.

That’s a bonus — not a requirement.

And depending upon the severity of the mess-up — like a bad habit that could jeopardize the safety of others and yourself — you may not always have the luxury of polite instruction.

Take advice with a grain of salt but definitely consider the merit of it. Not all advice is helpful. Not all advice is practical. And not all advice is correct.

If someone is very adamant you need to be doing something different but you honestly don’t see what that other person is talking about, ask him or her to explain. If after he or she explains it still doesn’t make sense, tell him you’ll look into it and move along.

A sign of a responsible person is the one willing to accept advice when something he’s doing is unsafe. Responsible concealed carry can sometimes fall into this category. If someone out in the real world or at the range spots some behavior of yours that could get you or someone else into trouble, take the lesson at face value, be thankful someone stopped to point it out, and correct the behavior if possible.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon WATCH: Store Owner Shoots At Armed Robbers, Sends One To The Ground

WHITEHAVEN, TN — When a pair of thugs entered a phone store looking to make some cash, they were soundly beaten by the store’s owner.

They were already brandishing their guns, and that was all the warning the owner needed to counter the attack.

As FOX 13 reports:

A Whitehaven store owner fought back when two armed robbers came into his store. It happened just Friday evening just before 6:00 p.m. on Millbranch near Shelby Drive.

The store owner fired his gun and started shooting at the two men. He hit one of the suspects who immediately dropped to the ground. The man was taken to the hospital and is expected to be okay. The other suspect is at large.

By the time the would-be robbers made it a few feet inside the door, they were being fired on.

As the surveillance video below shows, the fight was decidedly one-sided.

One of the suspects was reportedly hit, and found at the hospital later.

Take a look at the surveillance video below:

These thugs didn’t know what hit them.

This is another example of the importance of carrying firearms at work. These robbers were clearly ready to shoot the workers at the store.

Everyone in the area was threatened because someone thought it was a good idea to attack a local businessman, and if no one was armed except for the robbers, there’s a better than average chance an innocent person would end up seriously injured, or worse.

Stay safe out there, folks.

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Concealed Nation

postheadericon WATCH: AR-15 Owner Destroys Gun On TV To Help End Mass Shootings

As I sat here sucking on a ring pop that my fiancée bought, I was trying to think of something more ridiculous than a grown man sucking on a ring pop. True story.

Then, I was shown the way when California resident Chad Vachter stepped into my life via the internet.

Vachter was looking for some publicity, and boy has he received it. It’s not the first time that someone has destroyed or turned in firearms to show their support to end mass shootings, and it certainty won’t be the last.

He’s a gun owner and 2nd Amendment supporter, but damn, he’s doing it the wrong way.

For those with weak stomachs, you may not want to watch this beautiful rifle meet it’s end:

He told reporters, who were conveniently there during the destruction;

“I can’t do it,” he said. “I can’t have something in my house that so easily could become a part of another situation like that, and I’m not going to be desensitized to it. I refuse to.”

It almost sounds like he’s scared that he will go commit a mass shooting. Of course that’s not the case, but is he really afraid that it’ll be stolen and used to kill people? If it’s properly stored, that shouldn’t happen.

Oh well. Back to the media attention.

“The other night, when I read the thing about the school in northern California, I cried and I haven’t felt good since,” he said. “And although I’m still sad for all those victims and all the people affected, I feel like I’ve done the only thing that I can do in this equation. Even if it’s just a small thing, I did my part to make things better.”

Vachter did keep some of his guns, including a shotgun and a pistol. He may be unaware, but given his logic, he should have instead destroyed the pistol. Those are used in mass shooting far more than rifles.

I hope that Vachter doesn’t ever have to face a mass shooter like hero Stephen Willeford did in Texas. His now-destroyed AR-15 would have been a much better candidate against a  gunman in a similar situation.

He also encourages other gun owners to follow suit and do as he did to their ‘assault weapons’. It’s nice that he used the term, since we know that the media eats it up like I’m eating this ring pop.

In closing, I’d like to counter Vachter’s address to gun owners looking to take him up on his request;

Instead of destroying your firearms so as to keep them out of the hands of the next mass shooter, get in contact with me so that we can arrange them to be shipped and taken into my possession. I have the means of properly storing them, so they won’t be stolen. It’s because I’m responsible.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Store Owner Sentenced After Shooting Shoplifter In The Back

BAKERSFIELD, CA — A shop owner who shot a man in the back, back in March, was sentenced for the decisions he made.

Turns out, you can’t just go shooting shoplifters willy-nilly.

However, what’s surprising here is not the fact that he was sentence, but the length of his sentence — it’s about as light as could be.

According to 23 ABC News:

Elias Aguilar, the store owner who shot a shoplifter back in March, will spend 30 days in county jail. Aguilar was sentenced Tuesday morning after pleading no contest to assault on a person with force-great bodily injury.

In March, Aguilar shot David Carrillo, who attempted to shoplift $ 11 worth of items from the Azteca Market on Weedpatch Highway. Aguilar shot at Carrillo twice, hitting him once in the back. Along with his 30 days in jail, Aguilar was sentenced to 90 days probation. His jail time will count toward that jail time, meaning he will only have 60 days of probation once he is released.

Listen. Unless that shoplifter has a firearm, knife, bat, etc. out and is clearly a belligerent, you don’t open fire. Whatever they’re stealing, it’s not worth your freedom. It’s not worth your life. Replacing it will almost certainly be cheaper than whatever legal fees you’ll wind up with — and if you shoot an unarmed shoplifter, there’ll be legal trouble.

It is nothing less than astounding that this man was able to get so small a penalty for shooting a man in the back, even if he was a shoplifter. Other courts will not be so kind.

Stay safe out there, folks — but also stay smart. Keep a cool head. It’s more important than a defensive tool.

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Concealed Nation

postheadericon TTAG Owner Forced To Leave Restaurant, Because Concealed Carry

Robert over at TTAG recently shared a story about one of his favorite establishments and their dislike of guns. Well, maybe it’s not his favorite, but apparently they have some bread that will keep you coming back.

In any event, Robert was asked to leave by the owner –indirectly– by way of calling the police to inform them that someone was carrying a concealed firearm inside their restaurant. They either saw that he was printing, or remembered him and assumed that he had a firearm on him as he sipped his coffee.

Either way, here’s the story:


So there I was, eating the world’s best ham sandwich at Austin’s Baguette et Chocolat, when two cops entered the patisserie and approached the counter. I thought nothing of it. Neither did Heidi. And then my spidey senses began to tingle . . .

Cop one was in a quiet conference with the owner, who stood behind the counter. Cop two positioned himself against a wall, arms crossed, staring across the room. Not at me and Heidi. Across the width of the room.

My first thought: it’s an immigration issue. My second thought: that’s stupid. They’re not Immigration officers. And B&C’s employees don’t seem like the undocumented sort, if you know what I mean.

As Iris Dement recommends, I let the mystery be.

To the point where I asked the not-so-dynamic duo if they were staying dry (a day after Harvey whacked Houston) as I returned to the counter and bought a cup of coffee. They nodded without any apparent understanding or bemusement — not an entirely unfamiliar response to my “clever” comments.

At some point, officer one approached our table from behind.

“Excuse me sir, are you armed?”

As Hunter Thompson reminds us, when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. In this case — as in all of my various interactions with the constabulary — I became slow-moving, polite and stupid.

“What?” I asked, coffee in mid-air.

I turned to look at cop one, surveyed my surroundings and tried to guess what was about to happen.

“Are you armed?” he repeated.

My ability to answer this simple binary question was short-circuited by the cop’s blue eyes. Paul Newman didn’t have eyes that blue, and his eyes made the blue sky green with envy.

“Yes,” I answered, gathering my wits enough to realize my mistake.

When Texas passed licensed open carry, Baguette et Chocolat put up the requisite big-ass, door-mounted signage banning both open and concealed carry. I shared my disappointment with the manager and politely informed her that she’d lost my custom, and the custom of my TTAG staff.

And then . . . bread. Call me a hypocrite, accuse me of giving aid and comfort to the enemy, but B&C’s baguettes were a siren song this gun rights absolutist couldn’t resist.

Prior to that fateful afternoon, I stashed my gat in the car before entering the patisserie. That day, though, I forgot. I was wearing my Wilson Combat EDC X-9 in a Kydex holster under a T shirt. I was barely printing. But apparently enough to trigger the owner’s PC hoplophobia.

“Did you see the signs?” the officer asked.

“I thought they were just thirty-ought seven signs,” I replied, reckoning that both “no” and “oops, I forgot” wouldn’t cut it.

The officer’s blue eyes clouded with confusion. Clearly, he had no idea what I was talking about.

“Well the law’s always changing,” he said, suddenly trying to help me out. Calm me down. Prepare me for a ticket. Cover the fact that he didn’t know what the hell I was talking about. Something. “Have a look at the signs.”

Seriously? He wanted me to get up, go outside and read the signs? I glanced at his partner. He was deep into his bad-cop-at-a-distance, waiting-to-see-if-the-perp-complies routine.

OK then.

“I’m sorry officer,” I said after pretending to read the signs and re-entering the cafe. “I thought it was no open carry.”

I nodded at Heidi, put on my hat, made another apology and exited B&C stage right.

And that was that.

My bad, right? But I’m still annoyed that the owner called the cops.

I was a regular customer. I’d just bought $ 30 worth of food. I was with an attractive young lady. I was dressed well. I was calm and polite to his staff. All the owner had to do: ask me to leave and/or disarm.

I suspect I’m persona non grata at Baguette et Chocolat as a result. Luckily, I’m now on the ketosis diet. Even so, it’s a grieving process; I’m in the depression phase. Or maybe it’s just the lack of carbs.

One more thing . . .

Heidi and I were enjoying each other’s company in B&C for a good twenty minutes before the officers rolled up. I wonder if the owner ever considered how long it would take the cops to respond to an armed robbery or other violent incident. Probably not.


End scene.

It’s an interesting encounter, and I sit here wondering how I’d react in this situation. I still don’t know, but I’d probably wind up talking to the police outside a little more to dig a little deeper about how they feel about it. Regardless, if a private business doesn’t want you there with a firearm, that is their choice.

As a concealed carrier, what do you think about this encounter?

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Irresponsible Gun Owner: 3-Year-Old Finds Loaded Pistol In Truck, Shoots 4-Year-Old

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA — In a tragic case of irresponsible gun ownership, a man left his handgun in his vehicle unsecured, allowing for a three-year-old to gain access to it and accidentally shoot a four-year-old, WBRC reports.

Apparently, the man had the gun holstered inside his truck while he was inside a house, but it was not locked away and neither was the car itself.

A toddler was able to acces it and accidentally shoot a four-year-old with whom the child was playing.

The four-year-old boy was reportedly taken to a hospital, and fortunately it appears that the young child is in stable condition.

WBRC reports that it doe not appear that any charges will be filed, surprisingly enough. That did not stop one Birmingham police detective from expressing his frustration at the man who behaved so recklessly.

“When you do purchase a handgun or any kind of weapon it becomes your responsibility,” said Detective Erin Valentine Fitzgerald with the Birmingham Police Department. That’s your gun, especially when you purchase it properly and you get a permit for it. That’s (your) gun. Children are innocent. A lot of times the see guns on TV and they think of them as a toy. They don’t understand that shooting that gun can sometimes take a life and that person may not come back.”

This is why it is so important to secure your firearms. Incidents with minors do happen, and it’s our job to prevent them from happening with us.

It endangers children, and makes us all look bad. It’s unacceptable.

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Concealed Nation

postheadericon Irresponsible? Gun Owner Jumps With Firearm Inside Trampoline Park

NORTH FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA — A man is not being charged after Roswell police arrived in response to reports of an armed man jumping on a trampoline in a kid’s amusement center. The Sky Zone is a place for people to bring their kids and includes a section of trampolines. The man had a gun visible in its holster when he jumped atop one of the trampolines and started hopping. Parents became worried at the sight and told the manager who then asked the man to store his gun in his car.

The man refused. At which point, according to Kiro 7 News, the manager called police. However, police quickly determined that the man had done nothing legally wrong.

“I guess the guy felt that since there wasn’t a sign up, that he could carry his gun in there,” resident Vincent Freeman said.

The man told the manager he always keeps his gun on him to protect his children.

The question we’re asking our readers: was this an irresponsible practice?

As concealed carriers and writers of concealed carry topics, we constantly push responsibility and accountability for our firearms. After all, you can’t protect yourself or those you love if you can’t maintain control over your gun.

Nothing in the article suggested the man was jumping wildly or otherwise in danger of losing control of his firearm but the issue of public perception is a big one. It is this man’s right to carry a gun onto a trampoline inside a children’s amusement center. Until he loses control of that firearm, he’s not in danger of hurting anyone.

The question is: will other people trust him to jump around on a trampoline when their own children are potentially at risk?

It’s an interesting debate and I’m really curious to see what our readers make of this event. Nothing bad happened to anyone. No one was arrested. At most, I think the manager could have asked the man to leave if he is in a position to speak for the lease holder of the property.

Tell us what you think in the comments section below and, as always, carry responsibly everywhere you go, everywhere you legally can.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon 70-Year-Old Store Owner Shoots Robbery Suspects, Killing One; Not As Soft A Target As The Robbers Had Hoped

HOUSTON, TEXAS — As a local Houston store owner tried to get into his car, two armed robbers ambushed him. He drew his handgun and shot at both of them, killing at least one. Houston police arrived at the scene to find a deceased male matching the description given by the store owner. The whereabouts of the second robber are unknown at this time.

via ABC 13 Houston News

“When the first units arrived they found a black male shot on the ground behind the business,” said officer T.R. Jackson. “That man was transported to the hospital where he was later pronounced dead. It’s possible that male and another male attempted to rob our complainant out here.”

The store owner is a 70-year-old male who had just closed down his store for the evening. He was licensed to carry a handgun and police have filed no charges against him as they believe it was an act done justifiably out of self defense.

Despite his age, the man was more than capable of handling himself. That’s situational awareness and the daily reminder to always carry a gun.

It’s amazing how armed robbers have a tough time hitting someone who can hit back. Their success rate goes up exponentially when the person they’re ambushing is unarmed and afraid.

No doubt, if that man had owned a store in the Houston area, he’s seen his share of robberies and attempted robberies in vicinity of his place of business. This brings a real sense of grounded reality to a person because the idea of criminals attempting to hurt or kill people for their possessions is no longer theoretical. It’s a guaranteed probability.

That’s a big reason why business owners and everyday citizens decide to carry a handgun. It’s as simple as knowing that some day, it could be you that the bad guys come to rob. They’re not afraid of using deadly force against you — why shouldn’t you have the ability to protect yourself?

A decision to carry a gun every single day is one made out of great responsibility. It’s not just about protecting your business or your customers, it’s also about protecting your family. If they lose you, nothing in the world can replace that. When you get up in the morning and put that concealed handgun in your holster, you’re making the willful decision to come back to them.

Good work on behalf of this business owner. For the robber who got away, he’ll not likely be returning any time soon. And for the one that stayed, he’ll never hurt anyone ever again.

Carry every single day — at your place of business, in your home, and everywhere else in between.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon [CCW IN ACTION] Wannabe Gangster Tried To Rob The Famous ‘Hip Hop Store’ On 7 Mile — Discovers Owner Can Get Real Gangsta, Too.

DETROIT, MICHIGAN — A robber was shot and killed by the store owner of the ‘Hip Hop Store’ on 7 Mile and Forrer after the owner fought back. The fatal shooting occurred outside the store but Detroit police believe this was an honest case of self-defense.

“If there’s an attempted robbery, a citizen has the right to defend himself,” Officer Mark Thornton said to Click2Detroit.

According to WXYZ ABC News 7 Detroit, the robber’s family came forward and said he just had a baby a few weeks ago. While we certainly feel for that kid having to grow up without a father, the chances of that kid ever seeing his father are pretty minimal. If he wasn’t shot and killed this time, he likely would have been arrested for something else soon after — or shot and killed somewhere else.

It’s not the job of the law-abiding citizen running his business to wonder whether or not the robber attacking him has people that depend upon him. That’s a question that needs to resonate within the criminal himself prior to committing the crime.

Once the fight begins, it’s very much you or him. We’d prefer you pick you.

The business owner had a license to carry a concealed handgun but he very well didn’t need it because he was in his place of business.

The ‘Hip Hop Store’ became famous on account of Enimem. It’s become a mini-Mecca of sorts for the Detroit hip-hop scene. Unfortunately, it may also attract idiots with absolutely no sense of responsibility to their households, family, or community.

Detroit can be a pretty rough place. Unfortunately, as times get more desperate, idiots get more desperate. Bad ideas like “maybe I should beat up an owner of a store and rob his business” may start to sound like semi-rational thoughts. They’re not. But the only way that lesson is going to get hammered home is if law-abiding citizens refuse to back down.

Stand up for your own safety, health, and well-being. Carry concealed every single day.

Concealed Nation

postheadericon Truck Owner Tries To Stop Car Thief, Gets Knife Pulled On Him — Has A Gun

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO — When a man saw a car thief attempting to break into his truck, he did what most people would instinctively do when they see their property being wrongfully taken: stop the thief. The thief had other plans.

According to WFMJ, the car thief allegedly pulled a knife on the owner of the vehicle. But this owner doesn’t want to be a victim. He drew his handgun and shot the thief. The criminal ran — as they are wont to do — but he didn’t make it far. Police picked him up farther on down the street with a head injury.

The car thief lived and will likely face charges. The property owner didn’t suffer any injuries whatsoever and maintained his property.

Wow, win-win.

The point of carrying a firearm isn’t to kill people — it’s to protect life and, at worst case scenario, neutralize a threat. The gun owner neutralized the threat. He shot him when he saw that the thief was not going to back down from trying to take his property.

He didn’t follow it up or chase after the thief. The thief retreated. Good enough. Now, it is apparent the thief did suffer a pretty grievous wound but it’s unknown whether this was due to a gunshot or something else.

In either case, this guy handled the situation correctly. It’s his property and someone doesn’t have the right to walk up and take it. Heck, he even tried to de-escalate the conflict by trying to stop the thief.

It was the thief’s mistake to draw a knife.

Carry everyday, neutralize the threat.

Concealed Nation